The Road Less Traveled Exhibition Series

MYTHOLOGIES: EUGENE VON BRUENCHENHEIN

Lisa stone

Brett Littman

Michelle Grabner

Chris Wiley

Karen Patterson

June 25, 2017 - Jan. 14, 2018

In 1984, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center launched its first exhibition of Eugene Von Bruenchenhein's (1910–1983) work and currently cares for over 200 individual works by the Milwaukee artist. Von Bruenchenhein's work is garnering newfound attention and his work is included in exhibitions around the world.

Explore the exhibition

Ends Jan. 2018

About this exhibition

In 1984, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center launched its first exhibition of Eugene Von Bruenchenhein's (1910–1983) work and currently cares for over 200 individual works by the Milwaukee artist. Von Bruenchenhein's work is garnering newfound attention and his work is included in exhibitions around the world.

Taking an unprecedented, sweeping view of Von Bruenchenhein’s extensive oeuvre, this exhibition casts a contemporary lens on his paintings, sculpture, photography, drawings, and poetry. Michelle Grabner, Brett Littman, Lisa Stone, and Arts Center Curator Karen Patterson address pivotal moments in Von Bruenchenhein’s career—including architecture, botany, invention, and love—in this exhibition and a forthcoming catalogue, due to be released in September 2017.  

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Lisa Stone

HIGH WALKWAY CONNECTS TWO TOWERS

"In 1977, Von Bruenchenhein commenced his foray into fantastic architecture by devising a technique to apply paint in a way that allowed him to "construct" his towers: he dipped the edges-the wavy cross­section layers-of corrugated cardboard in paint and printed long, slender patterns on enameled sheets
of corrugated cardboard. The resulting masses of upright forms display a lacy grid design that emulates building blocks, a pleasing solution for creating the illusion of the complexes of his new architectural age."

Lisa Stone

Curator, Roger Brown Study Collection

Lisa Stone is curator at the Roger Brown Study Collection at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. For over thirty years, she has stewarded preservation planning and site preservation of art environments while writing widely on the discipline. Interested especially in the history of art sites in the Midwest, Stone’s response to the work of Eugene Von Bruenchenhein includes researching and writing about his sculptures.  

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Brett Littman

SEED-ACTION

"Von Bruenchenhein's interest in botany was greatly influenced by his stepmother, who not only painted floral still lifes but also penned treatises on the theory of evolution and reincarnation. He later worked at a flower shop and built a greenhouse on his property for cacti and other exotic plants. This desire to synthesize the organic (botany, chaos, natural geometry) with the rational (mathematics, structure, and image) can be seen as the creative "engine" that drives all of his compositions and sculptures."

Brett Littman

Executive Director, The Drawing Center

Brett Littman is executive director at The Drawing Center. He has lectured and written numerous catalogue essays and articles on art and design. In 2011, he curated and wrote the exhibition catalogue Eugene Von Bruenchenhein: Freelance Artist—Poet and Sculptor—Inovator—Arrow maker and Plant man—Bone artifacts constructor—Photographer and Architect—Philosopher at the American Folk Art Museum. For the Arts Center’s Mythologies: Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Littman focuses on the artist’s drawing and poetry. 

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Michelle Grabner

THE DANGER WE FACE

"Von Bruenchenhein's H-bomb series and his demon­faced cloud paintings emerged out of the endgame dichotomies that shaped 1950s Cold War culture. With great confidence, Von Bruenchenhein gave enchanting visual form to disorientating postwar vertigo, letting his imagination fill in the unknown and the invisible effects of the Anthropocene with poetry, painting, photography, and sculpture. From his small home in Milwaukee, Von Bruenchenhein's mid-twentieth-century worldview was fantastical and global, but his aesthetic was idiosyncratic and local, revealing a truth more pronounced."

Michelle Grabner

Artist and curator

Michelle Grabner is an artist, independent curator, and writer based in Milwaukee, WI. Internationally renowned for her work in drawing, painting, video, and sculpture, she is currently chair of the painting and drawing department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago as well as a senior critic at Yale University in the department of painting and printmaking. Grabner has long taught the work of Eugene Von Bruenchenhein. For this exhibition, she engages with new research and writing about Von Bruenchenhein’s paintings.

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Karen Patterson

DEAR MARIE

"The photographs of Marie are much more than a photographer posing a model for the camera. As husband and wife, Eugene and Marie orchestrated hundreds of these sessions together in the first
two decades of marriage. More than just portraits, these were photographic events in which they experimented with backdrops, poses, props, personas, and expressions. Not only do the photographs display a deep commitment to the media itself, they also suggest a specific way of being seen and of seeing each other."

Karen Patterson

Curator, John Michael Kohler Arts Center

Karen Patterson is a Curator at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center (JMKAC) in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Her primary focus is the Arts Center’s premier collection of folk art, self-taught art, and artist environments. She incorporates these works into curatorial projects that explore a variety of contemporary themes. She also works with a range of artists, artworks, and commissioned site-specific pieces. In addition to curating the 2017 exhibitions series, The Road Less Traveled, her recent curatorial projects include Ebony G. Patterson: Dead Treez, Ray Yoshida’s Museum of Extraordinary Values, and This Must Be The Place, an exhibition series exploring the relationship between artists and their formative places. Karen completed her Bachelor of Arts in Folklore Studies at Memorial University in Newfoundland, Canada, and her Masters of Art Administration at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where her focus was the home collection of Chicago artist Ray Yoshida. Prior to joining JMKAC, she developed interpretive programs for house museums and heritage sites in Canada and the US and co-founded a 12-hour public art festival, Nocturne: Art at Night, in Nova Scotia.

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Chris Wiley

INOVATOR  

"Skeptics will balk at the idea of Von Bruenchenhein having a spirit guide, and there is a chance that he was speaking metaphorically. But there can
be no denying his unique genius, which extended beyond his innovative artistic output into startlingly insightful philosophical musings. His curiosity seemed boundless; he spun fantastical tales about the origins of the earth, developed a theory of evolution, mused poetically about natural parallels across vast shifts
in scale."

Dig a little deeper...

Take a walk through this gallery and explore MYTHOLOGIES in 360°.

The Road Less Traveled Conference

Scholars, artists, preservationists, educators, activists, art historians, collectors and devotees will delve into the complex subject of artist-built environments during a three-day conference at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center.

Through a variety of performances, panels, and workshops, attendees will share new ideas and broaden the collective knowledge and appreciation of this unique style of art making that is the focus of a yearlong series of exhibitions at the Arts Center.

The conference, titled The Road Less Traveled, is the third Divine Disorder program of the National Park Service’s National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT). In addition to the Arts Center and NCPTT, Kohler Foundation Inc. is a hosting partner for the conference.

Sep. 27, 2017 - Sep. 29, 2017

Register

This exhibition is supported in part by a grant from the Wisconsin Arts Board with funds from the State of Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Funding was also provided by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Kohler Trust for the Arts and Education, Kohler Foundation, Inc., Herzfeld Foundation and Sargento Foods Inc. The Arts Center thanks its many members for their support of exhibitions and programs through the year. The John Michael Kohler Arts Center is a 501(c)(3) (nonprofit) organization; donations are tax deductible.

The Road Less Traveled 50th anniversary program was conceived by Amy Horst, deputy director for programming. The exhibitions series was organized and curated by Arts Center Curator Karen Patterson. Special thanks to Emily Schlemowitz, assistant curator, for the curation of Driftless: Nick Engelbert & Ernest Hüpeden and Folk & Fable: Levi Fisher Ames & Albert Zahn, and Amy Chaloupka, guest curator of The World in a Garden: Nek Chand and Volumes: Stella Waitzkin.