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Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation

June 22, 2018 — June 15, 2019
 

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

Apartment 4: Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation installation view at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, 2018.

 

It is believed that in 1927, Florence Hasard moved to Milwaukee to begin a new life. There is some evidence that she stayed in Wisconsin until 1942. While she had few possessions, we believe Florence had an active art practice and a faith in the city’s artistic community, embodied by Charlotte Partridge (1882–1975) and Miriam Frink (1892–1977) at the Layton School of Art. With this kind of generosity and the introductions they facilitated, we can speculate that she transformed a modest suite of rooms into her home and studio.

For Apartment 4, Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation collaborated to make a space for Florence, providing glimpses into her living room, studio, bedroom, and bathroom. The space is informed by Florence’s dark, introspective art practice that allowed her to work through the personal trauma she experienced as a nurse during the First World War. In addition, Apartment 4 will give hints to what her life in Milwaukee may have been like in the 1940s, providing context for a larger regional narrative and its local histories.

Through the interpretation of Florence’s home and studio in Apartment 4, we learn about what is revealed and what is concealed in different kinds of intimate spaces.

This exhibition will be on view through June 2019.

For more of Florence’s story visit florencehasard.org