About the Open House Project

Apartment 4 is the first in the Open House Project series, an ongoing Arts Center initiative providing a platform for emerging and underrepresented artists and art forms. Artists and organizations are invited to collaborate and experiment with new ideas and original content in exhibitions that use the galleries in the John Michael Kohler home as a place for artistic inquiry. The home, built in 1883, is a unique setting for the generation of new curatorial explorations of topics ranging from the familiar to the phenomenal.

Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation:

Apartment 4

June 22, 2018 - June 16, 2019

Essays

Featured Essay

Identity Books

Posted May 8, 2019

The 10th grade students at Brown Deer High School visited the Arts Center in November of 2018 to connect their learning to the exhibition Apartment 4. During the fall semester, students were working on answering the question, “How do our perceptions and senses affect how we see reality?”

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Florence and the Milwaukee Handicraft Project

Posted June 3, 2019

Although much of Florence Hasard’s life is shrouded in mystery, a few details about the character created by artist Iris Haussler are known. She was born in France in 1882, served as a nurse during World War I, and immigrated to Milwaukee in 1927, when she moved into Apartment 4. While we don’t know a great deal about her life in Milwaukee, we do know that she was employed as a seamstress in the Milwaukee Handicrafts Project.

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A Generational Lens: UW-Sheboygan Students Respond to Apartment 4

Posted May 22, 2019

After discussing Iris’ process and work, Professor Wendi Turchan assigned students two writing prompts: “Compare the two spaces in Apartment 4—how do they impact one another to create a sense of Florence’s identity?” and “Select one item from the installation and give it a story.”

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Identity Books

Posted May 21, 2019

The 10th grade students at Brown Deer High School visited the Arts Center in November of 2018 to connect their learning to the exhibition Apartment 4. During the fall semester, students were working on answering the question, “How do our perceptions and senses affect how we see reality?”

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The Body as a Historic Score

Posted May 8, 2019

Florence Hasard rented a modest flat and used it as both a domestic living space and a studio for her art production. She left the front portion of her home—the living room and bedroom—virtually untouched, with the exception of a small area dedicated to her professional work as a seamstress. Her studio, on the other hand, was a snapshot of Florence’s inner being.

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Florence in Paris: Marie Vassilieff’s atelier

Posted April 18, 2019

What did Florence Hasard’s community in Paris look like? Cubist artist and arts organizer Marie Vassilieff’s atelier and its surrounding activities allow us to speculate about the larger creative milieu in Paris.

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Mirroring Material Clues

Posted March 4, 2019

Florence Hasard, Iris Häussler’s fictional resident of Apartment 4, seemingly lived two separate lives. In this essay, author Natalie Wright looks at the various spaces Hasard occupied.

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Florence in Milwaukee: On the Polish flat

Posted February 13, 2019

When Florence Hasard emigrated to the United States from Paris in 1927, evidence shows she landed in Milwaukee. In a Dateline Milwaukee newspaper article published fifteen years later, we learn not only details about Florence’s sudden disappearance but also clues about the sort of life she lived in the Midwest.

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Nursing Mental Illnesses

Posted January 7, 2019

Natalie Wright of The Chipstone Foundation explores findings from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee's Center for Nursing History Archive to speculate about Florence Hasard's experiences as a nurse during WWI. 

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Sometimes it takes an object: Iris Häussler Interviewed by Julie Niemi

Posted January 7, 2019

An interview with Iris Häussler about her artistic practice, the exhibition Apartment 4, and the inspiration behind her character, Florence Hasard. 

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Living an unassuming Life: A Video about Apartment 4

Posted January 7, 2019

In this video about Apartment 4, Iris Häussler and The Chipstone Foundation's Sarah Carter and Natalie Wright provide insight into Florence Hasard's life in Milwaukee.

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This exhibition is supported in part by a grant from the Wisconsin Arts Board with funds from the State of Wisconsin and the National Endowment for the Arts. Funding was also provided by the Chipstone FoundationKohler Trust for the Arts and EducationKohler Foundation, Inc., and the Frederic Cornell Kohler Charitable Trust. The Arts Center thanks its many members for their support of exhibitions and programs through the year. The John Michael Kohler Arts Center is a 501(c)(3) (nonprofit) organization; donations are tax deductible.